Challenging Perspectives on the Indian Diaspora

Since the 1980s, Indian diaspora conferences have been organized to exchange knowledge about the practice of indentured labour, disparate experiences, research ideas, and future plans. The perspective was predominantly historical, although the conferences included contemporary topics. The themes of the conferences were not demarcated; in fact, all subjects were welcomed. As a result, the papers presented dealt with a wide array of topics. Looking back, it should be acknowledged that these conferences have yielded a huge amount of knowledge about the ‘indenture experience’. Today, the research field is almost exhaustively documented. This is the reason to move forward to new eras in the Indian experience and to new disciplinary perspectives.

In this international conference we would like to broaden the scope on the Indian diaspora from the experience of plantation economies. All these segments of the Indian diaspora have in common that they are linked with India (even if only for the consumption of Bollywood), are involved in homemaking practices, deal with legal issues when migrating, and exert influence in their societies of origin. Consequently, in this conference we would like to explore contemporary topics from new disciplinary areas, such as anthropology, economics, law, politics, sociology, geography, art and media, and of course, from history.

The Indian diaspora is a fragmented whole that largely consists of first- and later-generation migrants to Western societies (USA, Canada, Australia, UK – mostly NRIs), indentured labourers and their descendants of whom some migrated to Western societies, while others migrated to Asian and African societies. The forging of relations out of these shattered communities has increasingly been assisted by electronic media, specifically the Internet. This occurs, for example, in Bollywood, but also in other fields of representations. However, the diaspora has been conceptualized from India, or with India as its center. As a result, we are missing the perspectives from other societies outside India on India and on societies part of their diaspora. So perspectives can be many and may yield interesting and challenging views on and from the Indian diaspora.

programme

The conference runs for three days. Each day covers a central theme and will be opened with a lecture.

  • 08.30
    REGISTRATION, COFFEE and TEA / Central Hall
  • 09.30
    OPENING OF THE CONFERENCEAULA
  • 11.30
    KEYNOTE LECTURE – The inheritance of indenture and vice versaProf. Brij Lal, Australian National University / AULA
  • 12.30
    LUNCH / Atrium
  • 14.00
    PANEL 1: Indenture StudiesChair: Susan Legene / Room 3.14, 3rd Floor
  • 14.00
    PANEL 2: Historical PerspectivesChair: Vineeta Sinha / Room 4.14, 4th Floor
  • 14.00
    PANEL 3: Social IssuesChair: Marinus Penninx / Room 3.26, 3rd Floor
  • 16.45
    KEYNOTE LECTURE – Theorising the Indian diaspora: beyond persistence and changeprof. Narayan Jayaram, National Law School of India University, Bengaluru / Atrium
  • 08.30
    RECEPTION: COFFEE and TEA
  • 09.30
    KEYNOTE LECTURE – Moving Beyond a Diasporic Lens: Narrating Mobilitiesprof. Vineeta Sinha, National University of Signapore / AULA
  • 10.45
    PANEL 4a: National IdentityChair: Brij Maharaj / Room 3.14, 3rd Floor
  • 10.45
    PANEL 5: Ethnic IdentityChair: Brij Lal / Room 4.14, 4th Floor
  • 10.45
    PANEL 6a: Economics of Indian DiasporaChair: Susan Legêne / Room 4.26, 4th Floor
  • 12.30
    LUNCH / Atrium
  • 14.00
    PANEL 4b: National IdentityChair: Nalini Moodley / 3.14, 3rd Floor
  • 14.00
    PANEL 4c: National IdentityChair: N. Jayaram / 4.26, 4th Floor
  • 14.00
    PANEL 7: Politics and LeaderschipChair: Mohammad Kalam / Room 4.14, 4th Floor
  • 16.45
    KEYNOTE LECTURE – The Face of India’s mediated global modernityProf. Shakuntala Rao, State University of New York /
  • 08.30
    RECEPTION: COFFEE and TEA
  • 09.30
    KEYNOTE LECTURE – Economic aspects of the Indian diasporaprof. Ruben Gowricharn, VU University Amsterdam / Aula
  • 10.45
    PANEL 8: Art en Media
  • 12.30
    LUNCH / Atrium
  • 14.00
    PANEL 9: Diaspora Identity
  • 14.00
    PANEL 11: Gender Issues
  • 16.45
    KEYNOTE LECTURE – Comparing the Indian and Chinese diasporaProf. Peter van der Veer, director Max Planck Institute, Göttingen / AULA

speakers

The inheritance of indenture and vice versa

  • October 5th, 2017
  • 11.30
  • Aula

Professor Brij Lal

Theorising the Indian diaspora: beyond persistence and change

  • October 5th, 2017
  • 16.45
  • Atrium

Professor Narayana Jayaram

Moving Beyond a Diasporic Lens: Narrating Mobilities

  • October 6th, 2017
  • 09.30
  • Aula

Professor Vineeta Sinha

The face of India’s mediated global modernity

  • October 6th, 2017
  • 16.45
  • Atrium

Professor Shakuntala Rao

Economic aspects of the Indian diaspora

  • October 7th, 2017
  • 09.30h
  • Aula

Professor Ruben Gowricharn

Comparing the Indian and Chinese diasporas

  • October 7th, 2017
  • 16.45
  • Aula

Professor Peter van der Veer

sponsors